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Hundreds of AFSCME members, community leaders, and allies gathered to honor and celebrate the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Workers in Missouri and New Mexico have chalked important victories against anti-worker laws that would have robbed them of their voices and the right to bargain collectively.

Southfield, MI-  

Hundreds of AFSCME members, community leaders, and allies gathered to honor and celebrate the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

The best spokespeople for anyone running for elected office are everyday Americans spreading the word to their neighbors, co-workers, friends and relatives. That’s why public service workers who are AFSCME members came out this year across the nation to help elect candidates who support working families.

And we won big.

We won at every level of government and in almost every state. AFSCME members made our voices heard, helping our partners in For Our Future knock on 7.5 million doors and hold 925,000 conversations in targeted states.

Better wages. Check. Better working conditions. Check. And, thanks to unions, we now know there is also a union difference for workers who have access to critical benefits like paid parental leave.

According to recent data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 17 percent of all U.S. workers have access to paid family leave.  

At a time when our country needs real investments in infrastructure, education and public services, congressional leaders are doubling down on tax cuts for the rich.

AFSCME JOINS MICHIGAN NURSES ASSOCIATION IN CALL FOR DICKINSON COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM CEO TO RESIGN

Iron Mountain, MI- Today, the American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME, AFL-CIO) joined the Michigan Nurses in their call for CEO John Schon to resign his position as hospital CEO and administrator for the Dickinson County Healthcare System.

AFSCME Local 1176 represents over 300 workers at Dickinson County Hospital including nurse aides, LPNs, laundry aides, cooks, security guards, and other administrative professionals and healthcare providers.

It was 10 years ago this month that the 2008 financial crisis kicked into high gear. When storied Wall Street bank Lehman Brothers shut down, bankers walking out of the building carrying cardboard boxes of their possessions made the perfect image for TV cameras.

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.

Like others around the world, I mourned the death last week of Aretha Franklin. The Queen of Soul set a new standard for enduring classic songs with both artistic and political impact, like her mega-hit “Respect,” which became an anthem for both the civil rights and women’s movements.

And that song is on my mind as we embark on a week of action dedicated to shining light on the stakes for women in the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.